State Councilor Wang Yi said Sino-US trade negotiations

have once again made concrete progress and provided positive pro

spects for bilateral relations and the global economy. Wang, also minister of foreign affa

irs, made the remark at an event on Monday, according to a statement issued by the ministry.

Yao Yang, dean of the National School of Development at Peking University, said, “It is encouraging that both sides have begu

n to work on the text of an agreement, which indicates a speeding up toward sealing a trade deal.”

“The progress also showed that effective economic diplomatic meas

ures can help resolve cumbersome issues and reduce confrontation between two nations,” Yao said.

After tit-for-tat exchanges of hefty import tariffs, President Xi Jinping and hi

s US counterpart, Donald Trump, agreed in December to halt new tariffs for 90 days to a

llow for talks. Since then, negotiations have been conducted on a wide array of topics.

Early Sunday afternoon in Washington, Trump tweeted that he “will be delaying” the incr

ease of tariffs on Chinese imports scheduled for March 1, due to “very productive” trade talks between the two countries.

www.mxhehuoren.cn

Rudolph, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler introduced Sunday’s

  telecast, following Queen and Adam Lambert’s opening performance of “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Cham

pions.” The “Saturday Night Live” alums riffed off the messy build-up to this year’s awards.

  An abundance of drama surrounded the build-up to this year’s Osca

rs, even before getting around to the nailbiting best-picture finish.

  The contenders reflected the gamut of an evolving movie industry, with “Roma” representing Netflix’s arrival in mo

vies, after the streaming service’s model-bending impact on the TV business.

  On the flip side, “Black Panther” embodied the blockbusters upon which the studios have come to rely, and the th

ird-highest-grossing US release of all time at $700 million, nearly doubling that total worldwide.

  A number of individual nominees registered breakthroughs for women and people of color, only

a few years after lack of diversity among the acting categories birthed the #OscarsSoWhite hashtag.

zhongqianxue.cn

Huawei strongly denies the claims and is trying har

  d to persuade the world to use its 5G technology and not cave to pressure from Washington.

  ”This is not something that should be decided by politics,” Huawei’s chairman Guo Ping said on Sunday, ahead of the formal start of Mobile World Congress.

  Guo said he was hoping “independent sovereign states” will make “independent decision

s based on their own understanding of the situation and will not just listen to someone else’s order.”

  Huawei is taking the center stage at this year’s MWC in Barcelona. The event is expected to attract around 100,000 visi

tors. To get in, they will all need a badge like this, with a Huawei lanyard. pic.twitter.com/D6PRmZpqxe

  — Ivana Kottasová (@IvanaKottasova) February 24, 2019

  The US government is trying to convince its allies to shun Huawei equip

ment, which it says could be used by the Chinese government for spying. The company vehemently denies that claim.

  ”Just because you are from a certain country doesn’t mean your equipm

ent is not secure,” Guo said. He added that Huawei must abide by Chinese law and the

laws of countries where it operates. “Huawei will never, and dare not, and cannot violate any regulations,” he said.

  Vice President Mike Pence described Huawei as a “threat.” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has warned other cou

ntries that using Huawei would make it more difficult for the United States to “partner” with them.

www.zrwrgz.cn

Nigeria elections: Explosions heard hours before preside

  Multiple bomb blasts rocked the northern Nigerian city of Maiduguri just hours before presidential polls opened Saturday.

  The explosions happened at a camp for internally displaced refugees at around 5 a.m. local

time Saturday, Nigerian army spokesman Onyeama Nwachukwu told CNN. There were no reports of any deaths or injuries.

  ”There was an attack this morning at the camp by the militants, but the military h

as suppressed it at the moment,” Nwachukwu said, adding that the army was still assessing the situation.

  Journalist Simpa Samson told CNN the militants targeted the Teacher’s Village camp in Maiduguri, the capital of Nigeria’s

Borno state.”The military secured the place almost immediately and has stopped our cameraman from fil

ming, no one was hurt because the bombs landed outside the premises,” Samson told CNN.

  Security is often a concern in Maiduguri, a frequent target of terror group

Boko Haram. The city also has a large population of internally displaced refugees.

  The blasts came as Nigerians prepared to cast their ballots Saturday, a week after the country’s presidential and parliamentary elections were une

xpectedly postponed. It was the third consecutive vote to be delayed in Africa’s largest democracy.

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But dreams of a new reality for Iran screeched to a halt in

  But dreams of a new reality for Iran screeched to a halt in May 2018 when President Donald Tr

ump pulled the United States out of the nuclear deal. Despite repeated certifications that Iran was

sticking to its end of the bargain, Trump unleashed several rounds of stinging sanctions on the country.

  The US president said the penalties aimed to force Iran to end its military adventurism in the region, a demand that Iranian officials have repeatedly brushed off.

  Officially, the sanctions exempt humanitarian goods, such as food, medicine and medicin

al instruments. But in reality, shortages in essential goods have affected households across the country.

  Ali now gets the medicines to treat his daughter’s rare genetic disease, from friends living abr

oad. Her medical bill has more than doubled, forcing him to sell his car, work two jobs, and accu

mulate loans. He says that his entire salary from his day job as a waiter goes toward Dory’s treatment.

  ”I am a wedding singer at night. I try to stay cheery and

keep a smile on my face, but on the inside all I can think about is my daughter,” says Ali.

www.qianhuain.com

Because of sanctions, Iran’s health sector is struggling to

  keep up with soaring prices of medications and medical instruments, doctors tell CNN.

  European banks, fearing secondary US penalties, are reluctant to do business with Iranian companies even those not blacklisted b

y the US. Medical companies have had to resort to paying intermediaries exorbitant sums to secure ne

eded supplies, including imported medicines and medical instruments which have more than tripled in value du

ring Iran’s rapidly dropping currency, health professionals explain.Sanctions is the first problem in our country and in ou

r system. We can’t transfer the money and make the preparations for surgery. It’s a big problem for us,” says Dr. Mo

hammad Hassan Bani Asad, managing director of the Gandhi Hotel Hospital. “We have the procedures, but we don’t hav

e the instruments. It is very difficult for patients and maybe leads to death of some patients.”

  Though most of Iran’s medicines are domestically manufactured, much of the primary materials, m

any of them imported, are in short supply. And while the state provides universal healthcare, so

me of the treatment needed for critical cases cannot be covered by state insurance.

www.qianpadae.com

When the morality police personnel were issuing a wa

  rning to two ladies with improper hijab, people in the area surrounded them and prevented them from driving the two ladies a

way,” the police source told IRNA. “After the two ladies got off the police van, the crowd dispersed and that was the end of the incident.”

  Threatened with acid, rape, abuseotesting Iranmpulsory hijab law

  Threatened with ‘acid, rape, abuse’: Protesting Iran’s compulsory hijab law

  Video of the incident showed people honking their car horns in apparent protest. A man is

heard shouting “Let her go!” as a group of people surround the van. The sound of gunshots is then heard.

  The headscarf, or the hijab, has been a mandatory part of women’s dress in Iran since the 1979 Islamic revolution led to clerical rule of the country.

  But in recent years, some women have mounted opposition to headscarf rules by stagi

ng sporadic street demonstrations, some of which have gone viral on social media.

  Many women have also observed the dress rules more loosely in recent years. While signs instructing women to wear hijab ad

orn the walls of nearly every shop and restaurant, many wear short scarves which only slightly cover their heads.

qianpadcl.com

The first led to Schalke being awarded a penalty after Ota

  was adjudged to have handled the ball, reversing the referee’s initial decision.

  The near three minute wait for a verdict from VAR caused frustration not only for the players but also supporters inside the stadium.

  A second penalty was then awarded when VAR confirmed the refe

ree’s call to award another penalty, this time for a foul on Salif Sane by Fernandinho.

  ”It’s a penalty. The second one is a penalty too,” Guardiola told BT Sport. “…And the red card can be a red card.

  ”I trust VAR. I have arguments sometimes but not this time. They are both penalties.”

  Senate investigators want to question a Moscow-based American businessman with longsta

nding ties to President Donald Trump after witnesses told them he could shed light on the President’s commercia

l and personal activities in Russia dating back to the 1990s, multiple sources have told CNN.

  The Senate Intelligence Committee, which is probing allegations of Russian interference in

the 2016 elections, has been keen to speak with David Geovanis for several months, the sources say.

  Geovanis helped organize a 1996 trip to Moscow by Trump, who was in the early stages of pursuing what would become a lo

ng-held goal of building a Trump Tower in the Russian capital, according to multiple media reports at the time.

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The problem is, that new divide doesn’t fall down tradition

party lines — hence the defections from both of the UK’s main parties. And if how you voted on Brexit ultimately dictates how you vote, what do

es that mean in the context of the rest of a political platform?
In the 2017 general election, there was a direct correlation between how a seat vot

ed in the Brexit referendum and how the Conservatives (seen as more pro-Brexit) and Labour (seen as more pro-EU

) performed respectively.
Rob Ford, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester and au

thor of the upcoming book Brexitland, believes that this is because Brexit was never really about Brexit. “It’s what we aca

demics call the second ideological dimension. Traditional politics relies on the demonstrable: Do you support free-ma

rket economics or regulation? The second dimension has more to do with instinct: Do you want border control or to

welcome refugees? In this sense, Brexit wasn’t really a question of how do you feel about the EU, rather, do you wa

nt to live in a progressive, global UK, or do you want to retreat and live in a more traditional country?”

ashtvt.com

Here, we come back to the new group of independent

support a modern, progressive, global Britain that is very much a part of modern Europe. Cur

rently, both main say that they will deliver Brexit — albeit different versions of it. A new group in Parliament, free to vote and speak as they li

ke, can now make the case for a softer Brexit, or even a second vote, and do so in ways that could damage both the gove

rnment and the opposition.
But will they? That’s a crucial question. If the movement swells, it could create the mome

ntum for a second referendum and push one party or another (probably the Labour Party) to formally back such a vo

te. It could terrify Conservative Brexiteers into backing May on her deal. It could completely break the par

liamentary arithmetic and cause the UK to stumble into a no deal. It could force a general election in which all 11 los

e their seats. It’s very hard to tell.
But the main takeaway from this week is that these 11 MPs were so frustrated by t

heir own parties — for more reasons that just Brexit — that they needed to do something. And that it was now or never. T

hey were left with no good options because, right now, politics in the UK is spiraling out of control.

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